MULTITUDE


What are the “glasses” of architecture?


Kristen Le / Jackson Studio
Spring 2021


How does architecture change in a world where people have always lacked light perception?

This thesis shows how much of our existing architecture functions as an adaptation for abled people, questioning normative architectural practices.




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MULTITUDE


What are the “glasses” of architecture?


How does architecture change in a world where people have always lacked light perception?

This thesis shows how much of our existing architecture functions as an adaptation for abled people, questioning normative architectural practices.




< BACK TO DINNER!

NAVIGATING SPACE
“The Umwelt suggests space may be understood as a reflexively produced and immanent condition of subjective experience.”

- Michael Hensel, Space Reader


The process of architectural design, especially in the United States, has had a history of failure in accommodating people in marginalized demographics. This includes people of certain ethnicities, immigrants, or those with physical or mental disabilities.

In architecture, finding ways to prioritize these demographics in design is a means of resisting the strategies imposed on people by hedgemonic societal structures. Visual disability presents an incredible challenge to navigating the built environment - both because design is heavily oriented around the ability to see, and also because society is progressing towards a future that is increasingly digital.

There are six main architectural strategies outlined below that I used to make a space navigable without visual cues. Bright colors and high contrast help people who are legally blind as well. These show up throughout the body of work below.